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Peta’s Artichoke, Fennel & Blood Orange Salad with Apple Aioli

PetaA long-time fan of Kay’s work, when Peta Mathias found out about Koanga’s fundraising mission she wanted to know what she could do to help. Not only will she be introducing Kay in Auckland on the speaking tour, Peta also sent us this recipe for our organic heritage artichokes, alongside our old favourites Florence Fennel and Giant Geniton Apples.

artichoke purple de jesi

Artichoke, Fennel & Blood Orange Salad with Apple Aioli
(For 4 people)

For the salad:
500g fennel bulbs
4 blood oranges
8 baby artichokes or 1 X 390g tin artichoke hearts in brine
100g black olives
extra virgin olive oil
lemons
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
cup of fresh mint, torn but not chopped

1. Trim the ends off the fennel bulbs. Cut in half and cut tough hearts out in a V. Slice finely and immediately place in lemon water to prevent browning.
2. Take one orange and zest half of it. Peel it and the others, removing all the pith. Slice.
3. Cut the baby artichokes in half, scrape out the hairy choke with your finger and boil for 10 mins in salted, lemon water. If using tinned artichokes, cut in half and drain well.
4. Remove the olive stones with an olive stoner and sauté them in hot oil for 5 mins.
5. Drain the fennel well and toss gently with the oranges, zest,  artichokes, olives, salt, pepper and mint. Pile up on a platter and squeeze lemon juice all over. Serve the apple aioli on the side. A glass of Lombardi Sauvignon Blanc to wash it down with would not go astray.

Apple- Giant Geniton- MM106 R/S

For the Aioli:
4 cloves of garlic, chopped
1/2 tsp sea salt
2 egg yokes
1 tsp Dijon mustard
500 ml extra virgin olive oil or 1/2 olive 1/2 vegetable oil
lemon juice
a small tart apple, peeled and diced
1. Mash the garlic and salt salt together with a mortar and pestle.
2. Stir in the egg yokes and mustard with the pestle then gradually add the oil drop by drop.
3. When half the oil is in add a little lemon juice and warm water and continue the stream of oil, stirring with the pestle till all is incorporated. This can be done with a food processor or hand beater.
4. Taste for seasoning and stir in the diced apple.

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Kokako’s Urenika Potato and Quinoa Salad with Capsicum Aioli

cooked urenika22-1-09 015
The Urenika potato was the first Maori potato in Koanga’s collection. It is long and tubular with dark purple skin and flesh, which retains its colour beautifully when cooked. The Urenika is part of our potato trial where we are endeavouring to turn-back the deterioration of New Zealand’s organic heritage potatoes, which have been shrinking in size and losing resilience over the past 20-years. Read about our potato trials for 40-odd NZ organic heritage varieties here.

This Urenika Potato and Quinoa Salad with Capsicum Aioli recipe has kindly been shared with us by Kokako organic cafe in Grey Lynn Auckland. It tastes best when you grow the ingredients yourself  -get your seeds  here.
Serves 4

Salad ingredients
• 500g Urenika purple potatoes (cut into bite-sized pieces)
• 150g red organic quinoa
• 1 courgette (cut into small cubes)
• 10g red onion (sliced very finely)
• 50g green beans (cut into 2cm lengths)
• 10g pinenuts
• 5g chopped spring onion
• 5g chopped parsley

Aioli ingredients
• 25ml extra virgin olive oil
• 125ml canola oil 
• 1 egg yolk
• 1-2 garlic cloves
• 1/2 red capsicum
• 1/2 tsp whole grain mustard
• 1/2-1 Tbsp cabernet sauvignon vinegar (or any kind of red/white wine vinegar)
• salt and pepper to taste
1. Prepare the salad ingredients:
– Boil the Urenika potatoes for 10-15 minutes until sufficiently cooked.
- Cook quinoa in boiling water for 10-15 minutes.
- Sauté courgette until lightly caramelised.
- Spread pinenuts on a baking sheet and bake at 180°C, stirring occasionally, until golden-brown, which should take 5-10 minutes.
2. Prepare the aioli:
– Sauté or roast capsicum until nicely cooked, put aside to cool.
- Place egg yolks, mustard, vinegar, capsicum, salt and pepper in food processor.
- With the motor running, add oil in a thin, steady stream until the mixture emulsifies and thickens.
- Taste and add more seasoning or vinegar if needed.
3. Place all vegetables in a bowl and pour the aioli, toss gently. Taste and season if needed. Sprinkle over pinenuts, parsley and spring onion.

quinoa temuco amaranth ptQuinoa

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Preserving traditions

Mulberry BlackThe end of summer/beginning of autumn is still a time of great abundance in the garden and in the local environment. We’ve been drowning in organic heritage tomatoes from our garden and further-a-field wild blackberries, walnuts and apples drip from the trees. There are way more fruit and vegetables than we can eat… One option is to just leave the food in the garden and pick as needed. Carrots and beetroots will happily sit in our raised garden beds all winter, particularly in colder areas.
However, as we are mostly self-sufficient and rely on the garden to feed ourselves, it makes more sense to pull the veggies out, store them, and start planting new crops.
All of which means: it’s preserving time in the kitchen.

The techniques we use for storing and preserving food were all once common knowledge, but these days tend to have fallen off the edge a bit. Just as with many permaculture ideas, rather than re-inventing the wheel, we are re-remembering the methods which served our ancestors so well.

DSCF2908The clamp is one of the simplest ways of storing root crops over the winter, you can build a frame, create a space in the cellar or simply cover your vegetables in a mound of sand.

When storing food in a sustainable, permaculture system, you need to think about using appropriate technology and the energy inputs and outputs of the process. Ideally food storage should be achieved with free, locally sourced, low energy materials, such as solar power instead of electricity to dry food, salting instead of cooking to preserve, stevia instead of sugar for sweetening and gourds, traditional Maori poha (bull kelp) bags, animal skins or citrus for storing, rather than imported agee jars.
You can read Marco’s blog on building a simple solar dryer here.
drid toms

However, before food storage even begins, we need to take things right back to the start and focus on remineralising the soil.  The higher the mineral content of the soil, the more nutrient dense and high brix the fruit and vegetables will be, and the better they will keep. Produce with a high mineral content will store for a long time, slowly wizening, while low nutrient produce will just rot. Getting the soil balance right is the basis of all our work at Koanga.

DSCF2912One of the more delicious preserving techniques is making food into pesto or chermoula, which can keep in a sealed container for over a year.

You can make pesto and chermoula out of practically anything, but here is one of the recipes we made on our latest food traditional food processing and storing weekend workshop:

Pumpkin seed and Lambs quarters pesto

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Ingredients

½ cup Austrian hulless pumpkin seeds
2 cups Lambs quarters leaves
2 cloves of garlic
½ cup of olive oil
¼ cup solar-dried tomatoes
salt to taste

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We used our wonderful Austrian hulless pumpkin which takes all the hard work out of dehulling your pumpkin seeds as they have no outer casing and ready to go as soon as you crack open your pumpkin.  This variety should be going into our July catelogue for you to plant your own. Lambs quarters is an easy-grow leafy green plant. We usually pick it a day prior to pesto-making day, so the leaves wilt slightly. This reduces the water content, which helps it to preserve for longer. Adding more garlic, chilli, lemon, oil and salt will further extend the shelf-life of your pesto. Cheese is also a tasty addition. We usually make pesto in vast quantities, but this recipe should make one small jar/orange peel container/gourd or whatever your vessel of choice is.

DSCF2875

Simply grind up all your ingredients in a mortar and pestle or food processor and when you are happy with the taste and consistency, spoon into jars, leaving just enough room to pour a layer of oil over the top to help prevent oxygen getting in.

We’ll cover more recipes and preserving and fermenting tips in the next blog. In the meantime: Happy preserving.

DSCF2881

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Tomato, spinach, panir casserole

Recipe from Change of Heart by Kay Baxter and Bob Corker

Tomato Ponsonby RedYou can substitute any of the summer greens for spinach in this quick and easy dish.

8 heritage tomatoes – quartered and cored

2 cups cooked spinach

1 cup panir 1cm cubed* see recipe below

1 Tbsp lard, coconut or olive oil

sea salt and cracked pepper to taste

1 cup posole (ground) or breadcrumbs* see below

1/2 cup grated butter

Place tomatoes, spinach, panir, seasoning and oil into a bowl and mix well.Place into a baking dish and cover either with breadcrumbs or ground posole, mix well with the grated butter. Bake at 180degC for about 30 minutes or until brown on top.

*Posole – which you can buy in some supermarkets as Masa flour

Pasole is a traditional way of eating corn where the dried corn is processed with either wood or shell as to increase its nutritional value (up to 60 times more available calcium hydroxide. It’s best made in large batches as it is quite a process. If you have experience of making posole, please get in touch [email protected]
To begin soak six cups of dried corn overnight in water. Pour off the water and put in a pot with 2 cups of bone/shell ash-water, and cover with extra water. Make sure the corn remains covered throughout the cooking process. Simmer for one hour or longer, until the skin can be rubbed off the kernels.
Remove from heat and drain. Place in a colander and rub under running water until you have removed as many of the skins as possible. Then put everything into a bowl or bucket and float off the skins.
Return to the pot and cover with water. Continue cooking for another hour and repeat the whole de-skinning process until the corn kernels are white, fluffy and skinless. They are now ready to be ground for tortillas, added to soup, or dried.

*Panir

3 litres milk

1/4 cup lemon juice or vinegar

1 colander

1 cloth (30x30cm)

Bring your milk to the boil. Slowly add just enough apple cider vinegar or lemon juice to curdle the milk. (I prefer the taste of lemon juice in panir, but either is good).
Next turn heat off and gently stir as little as possible with a wooden spoon until you have a clear yellow why and a mass of panir. If you do not have clear yellow why, add a little more vinegar or lemon juice. Leave the curds in a solid mass, do not break up by stirring.
When you are happy your curds and whey have separated as much as possible, put a cloth inside a colander in the kitchen sink and ladle in the curds. Hang your curd-filled cloth up on the kitchen hook and leave to drain. this will happen very fast and not a lot of whey will come out.
Leave the curds to cool, than remove from cloth and use or freeze for later.
I usually cube the panir and to add to soups or fry and add to veggie dishes.
Because the whey has been boiled and will not contain the life raw whey contains, (although it still has many nutrients), I prefer to feed it to the animals rather than use it in the kitchen, but it can add excellent flavour to soups and stews in place of stock.

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Peach crumble

Taken from Change of Heart – The Ecology of Nourishing Food by Kay Baxter and Bob Corker

River-Peaches-31.1.07-034

Serves four

Slice eight ripe peaches and arrange carefully into the bottom of a 20cm pie dish. Sprinkle with 1/4 a cup of rapadura sugar or honey, followed by the crumble mix.

To make the crumble you need:

1/2 a cup of butter (grated)

1/2 a cup of rapadura* or honey

1 cup posole* or sprouted, dried grain wheat*, or wheat flour

If using posole or sprouted wheat, grind it in a corn grinder first, then place in a bowl with grated butter and rapadura/honey. Mix thoroughly with fingers and sprinkle over peaches. Place in a moderate oven and bake until golden brown on top. Serve with kefir cream or ordinary cream.

*Rapadura sugar is made from the juice extracted from the sugar cane which is then evaporated over a low heat and ground to produce a grainy dark rich sugar. It is free of chemicals.

*Sprouted dried wheat grain: Place wheat in a glass sprouting jar. Soak for 12 hours, then drain, rinse and leave covered to sprout for 12 hours.
Rinse, drain and cover again. Repeat that process until the small white rootlets first appear. Dry these sprouts in a solar dryer, dehydrator, or very low temperature oven.
The grain is then ready to grind as per normal. It has a sweet and nutty taste. We have organic heritage seeds for wheat and nine other grains available.

Posole – which you can buy in some supermarkets as Masa flour

IMG_5744

Posole is a traditional way of eating corn where the dried corn is processed with either wood or shell as to increase its nutritional value (up to 60 times more available calcium hydroxide. It’s best made in large batches as it is quite a process. If you have experience of making posole, please get in touch [email protected]
To begin soak six cups of dried corn overnight in water. Pour off the water and put in a pot with 2 cups of bone/shell ash-water, and cover with extra water. Make sure the corn remains covered throughout the cooking process. Simmer for one hour or longer, until the skin can be rubbed off the kernels.
Remove from heat and drain. Place in a colander and rub under running water until you have removed as many of the skins as possible. Then put everything into a bowl or bucket and float off the skins.
Return to the pot and cover with water. Continue cooking for another hour and repeat the whole de-skinning process until the corn kernels are white, fluffy and skinless. They are now ready to be ground for tortillas, added to soup, or dried. To grow your own corn check out our 17 different organic heritage seed varieties.

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Sauerkraut

Recipe from Change of Heart by Kay Baxter and Bob Corker

sauerkraut with outside leaves of cabbage

You can make any amount of sauerkraut at one time, however, you need to think about where you will store it.  In the Summer it will continue to ferment, being inedible after a few weeks if you don’t have a cool place to store it.  I prefer to make a large amount at a time in late Autumn, when I know it will keep for the whole Winter without getting too strong.  For making my sauerkraut, I use a pounder that Bob made for me out of a piece of Ti tree.  The bottom needs to be as wide and flat as possible, and you need to smooth the top so that you can hold it comfortably in your hand whilst pounding.

1 bucket (polypail, 20 litre)

1 pounder

about 10 cabbages

1 large sharp knife or a sauerkraut cabbage cutter

1 sterilized heavy stone

1 dsp sea salt for every large cabbage

1/2 cup whey

1 tsp caraway seeds for every large cabbage

  • Cut the cabbages in half, remove the hard stem (put into your broth pot) and slice the leaves as finely as you possibly can.
  • Once you have sliced the leaves of one whole cabbage, put it into the bucket and pound until the cells begin to break and let out their juice.  Continue slicing the cabbage and adding to the bucket with a little salt and caraway seeds between each cabbage, pounding until you feel the juice coming out of the cabbage.
  • Once  you have the bucket as full as you’re going to make it, tip in your whey and give the barrel a good mix.  Then place a plate upside down inside the bucket, on top of the cabbage, with as little room as possible between the bucket and the plate.  On top of that, put as heavy a stone as you can find, and then put the lid on (it will work with a cloth on top as well, as long as the juice comes over the plate within 48 hours).
  • Once you can see the juice is covering the plate and the cabbage fermenting, you can find a cool place and leave it there for around 3 weeks.
  • When the strong fermentation process has finished and the sauerkraut tastes good, you can pack it into glass jars and put in the fridge.  I usually leave it in the bucket in our coolsafe.

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Moroccan Lamb Tagine

Taken from Change of Heart – The Ecology of Nourishing Food by Kay Baxter and Bob Corker

Moroccan Lamb Tagine

Tagines are the Moroccan way of slow cooking seasonal mixes of meat (often the cheaper fatty cuts which are the ones we enjoy the best!), vegetables, fruit and spices in their traditional earthenware baking dishes that keep moisture in.  If you have an earth pizza oven, you can make these wonderful, rich, full of flavour dishes in the authentic way.  In Winter and Spring you might have to add dried fruit instead of fresh fruit, however in Summer and Autumn there will be loads of fresh fruit.  Some of those commonly use are apricots, apples, quinces, pears and even peaches.  The dried fruit could be prunes, raisins, sultanas, apricots and dates.  They always include lemons and olives.  These dishes are great the next day as well, so make more than you need and cook two meals in one!  You can use pork or chicken as well (p.185)

IMG_9986

9 Tbsp Moroccan spice mix (p. 263)

piece of organic lamb for 6 people

2 large heritage Pukekohe Long Keeper onions, chopped fine

4 Tbsp olive oil

3 cloves garlic

2 cups tomato puree or juice (p. 236)

1 litre bottled roasted tomato puree (p. 237)

1 cup dried apricots, cut in half (or other dried or fresh fruit like apples, quinces, pears)

1 litre lamb, beef or chicken stock

1 Tbsp honey

2 Tbsp cilantro

2 Tbsp Dalmatian Parsley, roughly chopped

  • Place lamb in a bowl with half the spice mix, cover and leave overnight in cool place or fridge.
  • Preheat oven to 150 degrees Celcius.  Heat 1 Tbsp olive oil in a large casserole dish, add the onion and remaining spice mix, and cook over gentle heat for 10 minutes, so onions are soft but not brown.  Add crushed garlic for final 3 minutes.
  • In separate frying pan, heat remaining oil and brown sides of lamb, then add browned meat to casserole dish.  Pour 1/2 cup tomato juice to the frying pan and warm whilst mixing the juice with their juices and flavours in the pan.  Add to the casserole dish.
  • Add remaining ingredients to casserole dish and bring to the boil.  Cover with a fitted lid and place in the oven to cook for 2-2 1/2 hours or until very tender  Sprinkle with chopped herbs when serving.
  • If you have room in your dish, you can cook potatoes with the meat, or kumara or pumpkin (just add for the final hour)
  • Separately baked Maori potatoes are great with this dish, as are mashed potatoes (p.115), mashed kumara (p.115), quinoa, rice etc.

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Amaranth Porridge

Serves 3 or 4 depending how hungry you are!

  • 1 cup of amaranth
  • 1 can of coconut milk (you can use ordinary cows or goats milk too)
  • 2 cardamon seeds
  • 1 curl of cinnamon stick
  • 1 handful of dried fruit, possible raisins or dried apricots sliced
  • 1 Tbspn of whey (you can easily make your own, just and a little yoghurt in a cloth with a bowl underneath; it will turn into cream cheese in the cloth, and whey in the bowl)

Soak the amaranth in 2 cups of water and the whey for 24 or even 48 hours – the longer the better.  Drain through a sieve – make sure the seeds can’t go through the sieve – and put grain and can of coconut milk with all the other ingredients into pot with 1 cup of water. Bring to boil and simmer on slow heat until grain swells, turn off and sit for 20 minutes.

Serve as is, or add fresh , bottled or dried fruit, and sprinkle with toasted ground pumpkin seeds.

Enjoy!