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Chicken Compost

I love my chickens… they have been in our family now for 30 years or at least this line of Brown Leghorns has been. I taught the Chickens for Eggs workshop at Koanga this weekend with Taiamai and I was reminded of all the wonderful breeds we used to have. I felt sad to think that for various reasons we don’t have the Golden Campines or the Golden Wyndottes we used to have for so long, but Taiamai reminded me that to do a good job of keeping a breed going for the long haul, requires a lot of energy and focus, and we can do that far better with fewer breeds of poultry!

Taiamai has Golden Legbars, I have Brown Leghorns and we have Fawn and White Indian Runners, Chinese Weeder Geese and Muscovies. The muscovies sit very early if they are well fed, usually July, then again twice more if they are well looked after it is possible to hatch 3 clutches under 1 muscovy each season. We let them hatch muscovies the first hatch, then use them as our mothers to hatch the chickens and ducks.

My forest garden has been designed to provide our chickens and ducks with high protein seeds and berries and the chicken house is designed to be a container for a large compost heap made by the chickens. We throw around 4-6 full woolsacks (fadges) of leaves in there in the Autumn and the chickens drop their manure onto the leaves all winter. It all stays very dry until it warms in Spring then I water it all and fork over and it will compost very fast into beautiful compost for the perennial beds, the berry beds or whatever you need compost for. I only harvest this compost once a year in Autumn when the leaves are falling ready to fill it up again, otherwise it is hard work finding the carbon.

I make all the compost I need in the vege garden with the carbon crops I grow in the vege garden but extra compost goes down very well on berries and perennials.

There is one key thing that I keep in mind when using chicken made compost.. and that is the Reams Test I had made from our chicken compost a couple of years ago. I’m very aware that to grow nutrient dense food we must apply the right minerals in the right relationships.. and the chicken compost was very very very low in calcium……calcium is key to growing nutrient dense food, and not only is the calcium super low but chicken manure is high on magnesium, so it is critical to add lime, EF:Nano Cal or some form of calcium regularly to the chicken made compost. Options for those not buying commercial fertiliser might be a local lime quarry or simply burnt bones, shells or eggs shells.

With the hot Summer days coming on it is time to give your chickens a little extra love to keep them free of pests and keep them laying.

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